Health

Faithful reach out to Pope Francis during an audience with participants of a pilgrimage of the Italian-Albanian diocese of Lungro, in the Pope Paul VI hall, at the Vatican, Saturday, May 25, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
May 25, 2019 - 9:18 am
VATICAN CITY (AP) — Pope Francis said Saturday that abortion can never be condoned, even when the fetus is gravely sick or likely to die, and urged doctors and priests to support families to carry such pregnancies to term. Speaking to a Vatican-sponsored anti-abortion conference, Francis said the...
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Amanda Furdge of Jackson and a mother of three boys, relates her experience seeking an abortion in the state, as she addresses abortion rights advocates at the Capitol in Jackson, Miss., during a rally to voice their opposition to state legislatures passing abortion bans that prohibit most abortions once a fetal heartbeat can be detected, Tuesday, May 21, 2019. The rally in Jackson was one of many around the country to protest abortion restrictions that states are enacting. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
May 24, 2019 - 7:33 pm
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A federal judge on Friday temporarily blocked a Mississippi law that would ban most abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected, at about six weeks of pregnancy. "Here we go again," U.S. District Judge Carlton Reeves wrote in his order. "Mississippi has passed another law...
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Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks at the California Chamber of Commerce's 94th Annual Sacramento Host Breakfast, Thursday, May 23, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif. Newsom said housing and inequality are two of the biggest issues facing state government and California businesses. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
May 24, 2019 - 7:16 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California lawmakers are headed toward a confrontation with Gov. Gavin Newsom over whether to keep a tax that can generate nearly $2 billion for low-income health benefits but means approval from the Trump administration amid a feud between state and federal officials...
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This photo provided by Novartis shows Zolgensma. The one-time gene therapy developed by Novartis, Zolgensma, will cost $2.125 million. It treats a rare condition called spinal muscular atrophy, or SMA, which strikes about 400 babies born in the U.S. each year. The therapy, given in a one-hour infusion, was approved for children under age 2 and will be available within two weeks. (Novartis via AP)
May 24, 2019 - 5:15 pm
U.S. regulators have approved the most expensive medicine ever, for a rare disorder that destroys a baby's muscle control and kills nearly all of those with the most common type of the disease within a couple of years. The treatment is priced at $2.125 million. Out-of-pocket costs for patients will...
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President Donald Trump delivers a statement in the Rose Garden of the White House, Wednesday, May 22, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
May 24, 2019 - 4:27 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration moved Friday to revoke newly won health care discrimination protections for transgender people, the latest in a series of actions that aim to reverse gains by LGBTQ Americans in areas ranging from the military to housing and education. The Health and Human...
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This Sept. 28, 2018 photo shows batting helmets in a rack before a Major League Baseball game in New York. According to study published Friday, May 24, 2019, NFL players may be more likely to die from brain diseases and heart problems than MLB players but the reasons are unclear. (AP Photo/Bill Kostroun)
May 24, 2019 - 11:46 am
CHICAGO (AP) — NFL players may be more likely to die from brain diseases and heart problems than Major League Baseball players, but the reasons are unclear. That's according to study published Friday involving 6,100 professional athletes who died between 1979 through 2013. Repeated head blows have...
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FILE - In this Dec. 14, 2018, file photo, an African Bush Viper venomous snake is displayed for reporters at the Woodland Park Zoo, in Seattle. The World Health Organization is publishing its first-ever global strategy to tackle the problem of snake bites, announced on Thursday, May 23, 2019, aiming to halve the number of people killed or disabled by snakes by 2030. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
May 23, 2019 - 10:32 pm
LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization is publishing its first-ever global strategy to tackle the problem of snakebites, aiming to halve the number of people killed or disabled by snakes by 2030. Nearly 3 million people are bitten by potentially poisonous snakes every year, resulting in as...
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Two people ask to take a photo with House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., center, as the Senate and the House of Representatives shut down for the week-long Memorial Day recess, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, May 23, 2019. Rep. Nadler, whose district covers parts of Manhattan and Brooklyn in New York, has gained notoriety by leading one of the House committees investigating President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
May 23, 2019 - 2:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Plunging ahead despite paralyzing partisanship in the nation's capital, senior lawmakers of both parties Thursday proposed legislation to tackle "surprise medical bills" and other concerns, from prescription drug costs to uneven vaccination rates. The draft bill from Sens. Lamar...
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FILE - This undated photo provided by Maricopa County Sheriff's Office shows Nathan Sutherland, who is charged with sexually assaulting an incapacitated woman who later gave birth at a long-term care facility in Phoenix. Lawyers for the incapacitated woman have filed a $45 million notice of claim against the state, saying she may have been impregnated before. Sutherland, 37, has pleaded not guilty to charges of sexual abuse and abuse of a vulnerable adult. (Maricopa County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)
May 22, 2019 - 10:47 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — Lawyers for an incapacitated woman who later gave birth at a Phoenix long-term care facility have filed a $45 million notice of claim against the state, saying she may have been impregnated before. The claim, which is a precursor to a lawsuit, also alleges the woman was raped...
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FILE - In this June 23, 2018 file photo, a U.S. Border Patrol Agent walks between vehicles outside the Central Processing Center in McAllen, Texas. U.S. border agents have temporarily closed their primary facility for processing migrants in South Texas one day after authorities say a 16-year-old died after being diagnosed with the flu at the facility. In a statement released late Tuesday, May 21, 2019, U.S. Customs and Border Protection said it would stop detaining migrants at the processing center in McAllen, Texas. CBP says "a large number" of people in custody were found Tuesday to have high fevers. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)
May 22, 2019 - 7:53 pm
SAN DIEGO (AP) — More than 30 migrants have tested positive for influenza at a major processing center where a flu-stricken teenage boy died, the latest evidence of growing public health threats posed by inadequate facilities to deal with a surge of families and children reaching the U.S. border...
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