Personal finance

FILE- In this Aug. 9, 2018, file photo a wildfire burns near homes in the Cleveland National Forest in Lake Elsinore, Calif. California homeowners may find themselves facing insurance issues even if they were not directly hit by this year’s blazes. The California Department of Insurance warned in January that the increasing number and severity of wildfires in the state were making it more difficult for homeowners to find and hold on to insurance. And now they say that recent massive fires may make the problem more acute. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu, File)
August 13, 2018 - 10:04 am
California homeowners may find themselves facing insurance headaches even if their houses weren't affected by this year's blazes. The California Department of Insurance had already warned this year that the increasing number and severity of wildfires were making it harder for homeowners in the...
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August 01, 2018 - 12:41 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The price war among mutual fund companies is hitting a new frontier, to the further benefit of investors. Fidelity says it will soon offer a pair of mutual funds that charge zero in expenses. The new index funds are part of a suite of changes Fidelity is making to lower expenses and...
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FILE - In this March 17, 2011, file photo, cans of Coca-Cola and Diet Coke sit in a cooler at a deli in Portland, Ore. Items ranging from canned beverages to airline tickets will likely get more expensive, companies warn, as they face higher costs. Procter & Gamble, one of the biggest makers of consumer products, said Tuesday, July 31, 2018, that Pampers prices will increase by an average of 4 percent in North America, while the Bounty, Charmin and Puffs brands could see 5 percent increases. (AP Photo, File)
August 01, 2018 - 3:12 am
The price of a can of Coca-Cola? Likely going up. A package of Pampers? That too. Plane tickets? They also may be more expensive. These items and more may cost more in the coming months as people start feeling the effects of higher fuel prices and raw-material costs as well as a range of tariffs...
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In this Wednesday, July 11, 2018, photo, Ben Kovler, CEO, Green Thumb Industries poses for a portrait at the company's office in Chicago. Green Thumb Industries had a business plan, expertise and plenty of ambition, but didn’t have access to enough capital to grow its marijuana business. Last month, the company with $20 million in revenue from pot shops in seven states turned its gaze north and went public in Canada, where marijuana soon will be broadly legalized nationwide. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
July 25, 2018 - 1:25 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Green Thumb Industries had a business plan, expertise and plenty of ambition to grow its marijuana business. What the Chicago-based company didn't have was access to enough capital to make it all happen. So last month, the company with $20 million in revenue from pot shops in...
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