In this Feb. 14, 2019 photo, patrons play the slot-style machines at the Ponca Tribe's Prairie Flower Casino in Carter Lake, Iowa. Some 150 years after suffering the loss of tribal lands and near-extinction at the hands of the U.S. government, the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska is celebrating a triumph with the opening of a casino intended to secure a stream of revenue for the long-struggling tribe, but is fighting to keep it open in the face of lawsuits by officials in Nebraska and Iowa. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

Ponca Tribe fighting 2 states and a city to keep new casino

March 03, 2019 - 11:27 am

CARTER LAKE, Iowa (AP) — Some 150 years after suffering the loss of its homeland at the hands of the U.S. government, the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska is again fighting efforts by other governments to take something it has built — a new casino on the banks of the Missouri River.

The $10 million Prairie Flower Casino opened in November with 200 slot-style machines, some 10 years after the tribe began its effort to open the casino. The neighboring city of Council Bluffs, Iowa, is home to three other casinos. That city and the states of Iowa and Nebraska are suing to have it shut down.

Central to those efforts is the casino's location. It's in Carter Lake, the only Iowa city on the western side of the Missouri River that is essentially in the heart of Omaha, Nebraska, where casinos are prohibited.

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