Biology

In this undated photo provided by the New England Aquarium in May 2019, Dr. Rosalind Rolland, Director of Ocean Health and a Senior Scientist in the Research Department at the New England Aquarium in Boston, poses on a boat next to a southern right whale taken during an expedition to the Auckland Islands, an archipelago of New Zealand. Whale researchers in New England say they’ve found a new way to measure the amount of stress felt by giant whales, and the technique could help protect the massive sea creatures. (Scott Kraus/New England Aquarium via AP)
May 29, 2019 - 2:41 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Whale researchers in New England believe they've found a new way to measure the amount of stress felt by whales when they experience traumas such as entanglements in fishing gear, and they say the technique could help protect the massive sea creatures from extinction. The...
Read More
This 2011 digitally-colorized electron microscope image made available by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases shows a clump of green-colored, spheroid-shaped, Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria on a purple-colored matrix. We share our bodies with trillions of mostly friendly microbes that are important for things like good digestion. Now scientists are learning how that microbial zoo can change in ways that one day might let them predict who’s at risk for brewing health problems. (NIAID via AP)
May 29, 2019 - 1:29 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — We share our bodies with trillions of microbes that are critical to staying healthy, but now scientists are getting a much-needed close look at how those bugs can get out of whack and spur disease. One lesson: A single test to see what gut bacteria you harbor won't tell much...
Read More
Young demonstrators take part in a demonstration organised by 'Global Strike 4 Climate' near Parliament in London, Friday, May 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
May 24, 2019 - 8:32 am
BERLIN (AP) — Protesters are holding rallies in several European Union countries to demand tougher action against global warming, as the 28-nation bloc votes to fill the European Parliament. Thousands attended a rally Friday in Berlin, where mostly young people waved banners with slogans such as "...
Read More
May 19, 2019 - 7:58 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska's fledgling commercial seaweed industry is growing, with producers excited about this year's harvest. There were no commercial seaweed farmers in Alaska five years ago, though there have long been subsistence seaweed harvests along Alaska coasts. Now, there are 16...
Read More
May 10, 2019 - 5:11 pm
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — A microorganism that played a role in treating tuberculosis is now officially recognized as New Jersey's state microbe. Gov. Phil Murphy signed a bill Friday giving the distinction to Streptomyces (strep-toh-MY'-seez) griseus (GREE'-say-us). The microbe was discovered in New...
Read More
FILE - In this Oct. 21, 2018, file photo, a couple walks through a forest with the Frankfurt skyline in background near Frankfurt, Germany. Development that’s led to loss of habitat, climate change, overfishing, pollution and invasive species is causing a biodiversity crisis, scientists say in a new United Nations science report released Monday, May 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, File)
May 07, 2019 - 10:30 am
You may go your entire life without seeing an endangered species, yet the globe's biodiversity crisis threatens all of humanity in numerous unseen or unrecognized ways, scientists say. A massive United Nations report this week warned that nature is in trouble, estimated 1 million species are...
Read More
FILE - In this Dec. 14, 2011, file photo, a lemur looks through the forest at Andasibe-Mantadia National Park in Andasibe, Madagascar. Development that’s led to loss of habitat, climate change, overfishing, pollution and invasive species is causing a biodiversity crisis, scientists say in a new United Nations science report released Monday, May 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Jason Straziuso, File)
May 06, 2019 - 12:23 pm
People are putting nature in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday. But it's not too late to fix the problem, according to the United Nations' first comprehensive report on biodiversity...
Read More
In this 2015 photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the American burying beetle handled in Rock Island, R.I. U.S. wildlife officials say the endangered carnivorous beetle is making a comeback and should be downlisted to threatened. The beetle was listed as endangered in 1989 after its historic range over 35 states and three Canadian provinces shrank to just eastern Oklahoma and Block Island off the cost of Rhode Island. Officials say populations now also can be found in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, South Dakota, Texas, and on Nantucket Island off the coast of Massachusetts. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)
May 01, 2019 - 6:13 pm
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Federal wildlife officials said Wednesday a large scavenging beetle that has been classified as endangered since 1989 has become more plentiful and should be downlisted to threatened, a decision that environmentalists said is not justified by scientific data. The American...
Read More
Joergen Ree Wiig tries to reach the harness attached to a beluga whale before the Norwegian fishermen were able to removed the tight harness, off the northern Norwegian coast Friday, April 26, 2019. The harness strap which features a mount for an action camera, says "Equipment St. Petersburg" which has prompted speculation that the animal may have escaped from a Russian military facility. (Joergen Ree Wiig/Norwegian Direcorate of Fisheries Sea Surveillance Unit via AP)
April 30, 2019 - 11:51 am
COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — A beluga whale found in Arctic Norway wearing a harness that suggests links to a military facility in Russia is so tame that residents can pet the mammal on its nose. The white whale found frolicking in the frigid harbor of Tufjord, a hamlet near Norway's northernmost...
Read More
Visitors to the Oklahoma City National Memorial walk around the "Survivor Tree," a 100-year-old American elm and symbol of hope after the deadly 1995 bombing, Friday, April 19, 2019, in Oklahoma City. Science and technology are helping Oklahoma City to sustain the DNA of the tree symbolizing hope 24 years after the deadliest act of domestic terrorism on U.S. soil. As part of an annual remembrance of the bombing, civic leaders on Friday plan to transplant a tree that was cloned from the scarred American elm that lived through the blast. They hope the younger elm will replace the "Survivor Tree" once it dies. (AP Photo/Adam Kealoha Causey)
April 19, 2019 - 6:08 pm
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Science and technology are helping Oklahoma City to sustain the DNA — and the spirit — of a tree that has symbolized hope in the 24 years since the deadliest act of domestic terrorism in U.S. history shook the city to its core. As part of an annual remembrance of the bombing,...
Read More

Pages