Biology

This 2018 photo provided by the University of New Hampshire shows a ground nesting bee pollinating a flower in New Hampshire. The species is one of 14 declining wild bee species identified in a study published in April 2019 by researchers at the university. The new study has found that more than a dozen wild bee species critical to pollinating fruits and vegetables across New England are on the decline. (University of New Hampshire/Molly Jacobson via AP)
April 18, 2019 - 11:25 am
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — More than a dozen wild bee species critical to pollinating everything from blueberries to apples in New England are on the decline, according to a new study. Researchers from the University of New Hampshire wanted to understand if the documented declines hitting honeybees and...
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April 16, 2019 - 2:59 pm
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) — A Harvard University residence hall is ending a decades-old tradition of skinning and barbecuing a goat in the courtyard. The Harvard Crimson student newspaper reports that Dunster House Faculty Deans Cheryl Chen and Sean Kelly informed students of the decision in an email...
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FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2002, file photo, Sydney Brenner, a professor in the Molecular Sciences Institute in Berkeley, Calif., gestures during a press conference in Munich, Germany. Brenner, a Nobel Prize-winning biologist who helped decipher the genetic code and whose research on a roundworm laid the groundwork for decades of human disease research, has died. The Salk Institute for Biological Studies in California said Brenner died Friday, April 5, 2019 in Singapore. He was 92. (AP Photo/Jan Pitman, File)
April 06, 2019 - 6:01 pm
LA JOLLA, Calif. (AP) — Sydney Brenner, a Nobel Prize-winning biologist who helped decipher the genetic code and whose research on a roundworm sparked a new field of human disease research, has died. He was 92. The Salk Institute for Biological Studies in California, where Brenner spent part of his...
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FILE - This Monday, July 10, 2017 file photo shows different shaped glasses of wine in Sonoma, Calif. According to a large genetic study released on Thursday, April 4, 2019, drinking alcohol raises the risk of high blood pressure and stroke, debunking previous claims that moderate drinking was protective. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
April 04, 2019 - 6:56 pm
LONDON (AP) — It might just be enough to kill your buzz: A new study challenges the idea that a drink or two a day could actually be good for you. In a study conducted in China, the researchers found that moderate drinking slightly raised the risk of stroke and high blood pressure. They weren't...
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FILE - This Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017 photo shows Shelley, an adopted cat, at its new home in Philadelphia. A study released on Thursday, April 4, 2019, suggests house cats respond to the sound of their own names. Researchers said it’s the first experimental evidence that cats can distinguish between words people say. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
April 04, 2019 - 9:01 am
NEW YORK (AP) — This may not surprise many cat owners, but a new study says cats can respond to the sound of their own names. The researchers said it's the first experimental evidence that cats can distinguish between words people say. To test for that, the Japanese researchers had animals listen...
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Primatologist Jane Goodall addresses the Los Angeles City Council Wednesday, April 3, 2019. Los Angeles city leaders honored the lifetime achievements of Goodall by singing "Happy Birthday" to her on her 85th birthday. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
April 03, 2019 - 7:58 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Los Angeles city leaders honored the lifetime achievements of famed primatologist Jane Goodall by singing "Happy Birthday" to her on her 85th birthday. Goodall vocalized a chimpanzee greeting Wednesday at the City Hall ceremony and pulled Mayor Eric Garcetti over to demonstrate...
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Braden Scott gives a thumbs up as he pauses while practicing on the piano in Tomball, Texas on Friday, March 29, 2019. Braden was diagnosed with the mysterious syndrome called acute flaccid myelitis, or AFM, in 2016 and was paralyzed almost completely. But since then he has recovered much of his muscle function. His parents believe a lot of it has to do with thousands of hours of physical therapy. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
April 02, 2019 - 5:14 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — One morning last fall, 4-year-old Joey Wilcox woke up with the left side of his face drooping. It was the first sign of an unfolding nightmare. Three days later, Joey was in a hospital intensive care unit, unable to move his arms or legs or sit up. Spinal taps and other tests failed...
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FILE - In this Aug. 8, 2018, file photo, a healthcare worker from the World Health Organization gives an Ebola vaccination to a front line aid worker in Mangina, Democratic Republic of Congo. One-fourth of the people interviewed in eastern Congo last year believed Ebola wasn't real, according to a new study released Wednesday, underscoring the enormous challenges health care workers are now facing. (AP Photo/Al-hadji Kudra Maliro, File)
March 28, 2019 - 5:24 am
DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — One out of four people interviewed in eastern Congo last year believed Ebola wasn't real, according to a new study, underscoring the enormous challenges health care workers are facing in what has become the second-deadliest outbreak in history. The survey released late...
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In this Tuesday, March 12, 2019 photo, a loggerhead turtle swims in a tank at a marine animal rehabilitation center near Boston. Warmer waters in New England are proving attractive to sea turtles, but with a catch. Many are swimming north only to be trapped by cooling waters. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
March 28, 2019 - 1:14 am
QUINCY, Mass. (AP) — At a sea turtle hospital housed at an old New England shipyard, a biologist leans over a table and uses a needle to draw blood from a sick loggerhead before tagging its flailing flipper. These were the first tentative steps toward a return to the ocean for this juvenile...
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This Feb 23, 2019, photo shows the inside of a computer with the ASUS logo in Jersey City, N.J. Security researchers say hackers infected tens of thousands of computers from the Taiwanese vendor ASUS with malicious software for months last year through the company’s online automatic update service. Kaspersky Labs said Monday, March 25, that the exploit likely affected more than 1 million computers from the world’s No. 5 computer company, though it was designed to surgically install a backdoor in a much smaller number of PCs. (AP Photo/Jenny Kane)
March 25, 2019 - 9:54 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Security researchers say that hackers infected tens of thousands of computers from the Taiwanese vendor ASUS with malicious software last year through the company's online automatic update service. Kaspersky Lab, a Russian cybersecurity firm, said Monday that it detected 57,000...
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