Courts

August 15, 2019 - 12:13 pm
MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mexico's Supreme Court has ordered the country's Health Department to set regulations complying with a law allowing medical use of marijuana and derivatives. The law took effect in June 2017 but has yet to be put into practice. The high court says in a statement that the Health...
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FILE - In this Oct. 27, 2018 file photo, people cast their ballots ahead of the Nov. 6, general election at Jim Miller Park in Marietta, Ga. Georgia election officials have little room for error as they work to replace thousands of outdated voting machines statewide in only a matter of months. The state is making a $106 million purchase of new voting machines. (AP Photo/Mike Stewart, File)
August 15, 2019 - 9:37 am
ATLANTA (AP) — A federal judge on Thursday ordered Georgia to stop using its outdated voting machines after this year and to be ready with hand-marked paper ballots if its new system isn't in place for the presidential primaries. U.S. District Judge Amy Totenberg's 153-page ruling Thursday is not a...
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FILE - In this file photo dated Thursday, July 4, 2019, Grace 1 super tanker is anchored near a Royal Marine patrol vessel off the coast of the British territory of Gibraltar. A newspaper in Gibraltar is reporting Thursday Aug. 15, 2019, that the United States has applied to seize the Iranian supertanker Grace 1, that authorities in the British overseas territory are seeking to release from detention. (AP Photo/Marcos Moreno, FILE)
August 15, 2019 - 8:18 am
MADRID (AP) — The United States moved on Thursday to halt the release of an Iranian supertanker detained in Gibraltar for breaching EU sanctions on oil shipments to Syria, thwarting efforts by authorities in London and the British overseas territory to defuse tensions with Tehran. The Gibraltar...
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FILE - In this Feb. 18, 1997 file photo, then John McGrail, director of the Department of Energy stockpile stewardship program, talks about the $100 million Device Assembly Facility behind him at the Nevada Test Site in Mercury, Nev. Nevada's U.S. senators and Energy Secretary Rick Perry are set to tour the site north of Las Vegas where the federal government is handling weapons-grade plutonium shipped from South Carolina. A federal appeals court has ruled against Nevada in a legal battle over the U.S. government's secret shipment of weapons-grade plutonium to a site near Las Vegas. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2019, denied the state's appeal after a judge refused to block any future shipments to Nevada. The court in San Francisco says the matter is moot because the Energy Department already sent the radioactive material and has promised that no more will be hauled there. (AP Photo/Lennox McLendon, File)
August 13, 2019 - 9:59 pm
RENO, Nev. (AP) — A federal appeals court on Tuesday ruled against Nevada in a battle with the U.S. government over its secret shipment of weapons-grade plutonium to a site near Las Vegas but the state's attorney general says the fight isn't over yet. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit...
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August 13, 2019 - 8:05 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A judge barred the Trump administration on Tuesday from acting on the recommendations of an energy advisory panel that was created to make it easier to extract fossil fuels from public lands and waters. U.S. District Judge Donald Molloy sided with a Montana-based conservation...
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FILE - In this July 1, 2019, file photo, U.S. Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., leaves federal court after a hearing in San Diego. Hunter, who is facing corruption charges, wants his Sept. 10 trial postponed while his attorneys appeal a judge's refusal a month earlier to dismiss the case. (AP Photo/Denis Poroy, File)
August 13, 2019 - 1:54 am
SAN DIEGO (AP) — U.S. Republican Rep. Duncan Hunter, who is facing corruption charges, wants his Sept. 10 trial postponed while his attorneys appeal a judge's refusal last month to dismiss the case. The California lawmaker's attorneys plan to make the request Tuesday to the federal judge in San...
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FILE - This Oct. 24, 2011, file photo released by Utah Department of Corrections shows Utah death row inmate Ron Lafferty. A Utah death row inmate whose double-murder case was featured in the book "Under the Banner of Heaven" inched closer to becoming the first person to be executed by firing squad in nearly a decade after losing his latest appeal Monday, Aug. 12, 2019. (Utah Department of Corrections via AP, File)
August 12, 2019 - 7:23 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A Utah death row inmate featured in the popular book "Under the Banner of Heaven" after killing his sister-in-law and her child for resisting his polygamist beliefs inched closer to becoming the first American to be executed by firing squad in nearly a decade after losing his...
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FILE - In this Jan. 13, 2014 file photo, former California State Sen. Kevin de Leon, D-Los Angeles, displays a homemade fully automatic rifle, confiscated by the Department of Justice, at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. California is among a handful of states taking tough actions to limit the availability of guns including military-style assault weapons, restrict the capacity of ammunition magazines and require background checks for purchasing bullets. But those steps and future gun control laws passed by Democratic-leaning states could face an uphill battle as the federal court system becomes increasingly dominated by conservative Republican appointees.(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
August 11, 2019 - 12:55 am
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California has some of the toughest gun laws in the nation, including a ban on the type of high-capacity ammunition magazines used in some of the nation's deadliest mass shootings. How long those types of laws will stand is a growing concern among gun control advocates in...
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In this March 27, 2019, photo, Robert Zangrillo departs federal court in Boston after a hearing in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. Lawyers for Zangrillo plan to argue that he isn’t much different from parents who make formal donations to schools in the hopes of giving their children an edge in admissions. (Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via AP)
August 09, 2019 - 11:11 am
BOSTON (AP) — Robert Zangrillo is accused of paying $250,000 to get his daughter into college as a fake athlete. Prosecutors call it a bribe. But his lawyers say Zangrillo isn't much different from parents who make formal donations to try to give their children an advantage in the admissions...
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FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2014, file photo, protesters march in the street as lightning flashes in the distance in Ferguson, Mo. Michael Brown's death on Aug. 9, 2014, at the hands of a white Missouri police officer stands as a seismic moment of race relations in America. The fledgling Black Lives Matter movement found its voice, police departments fell under intense scrutiny, progressive prosecutors were elected and court policies revised. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)
August 08, 2019 - 9:01 pm
FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) — Michael Brown's death at the hands of a white Missouri police officer stands as a seismic moment in American race relations. The fledgling Black Lives Matter movement found its voice, police departments fell under intense scrutiny, progressive prosecutors were elected and court...
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