Courts

September 13, 2019 - 8:59 am
CASCO TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) — A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit by a former Michigan school principal who says his rights were violated when he was forced out of his job for giving a wooden penis as a gift that he said was based on an inside joke. John Stanton sued Superintendent Leonard...
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A Honduran migrant prepares tortillas and rice at the Pan de Vida shelter for migrants where she and her two daughters are living while waiting their turn to apply for asylum in the U.S. in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019. Mexican Foreign Secretary Marcelo Ebrard said Thursday that Mexico's government doesn't agree with an "astonishing" U.S. Supreme Court order that would block migrants from countries other than Mexico and Canada from applying for asylum at U.S. borders. (AP Photo/Christian Chavez)
September 12, 2019 - 7:32 pm
CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico (AP) — With a go-ahead from the Supreme Court, the Trump administration Thursday began enforcing a radical new rule denying asylum to most migrants arriving at the southern border — a move that spread despair among those fleeing poverty and violence in their homelands. A...
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September 12, 2019 - 6:48 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A New York City law banning so-called gay conversion therapy would be repealed under legislation introduced Thursday over concerns that a pending federal lawsuit could lead to a decision unfavorable to the LGBTQ community if the case were to make it to the Supreme Court. Council...
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FILE - In this June 7, 2018, file photo, a puddle blocks a path that leads into the Panther Island Mitigation Bank near Naples, Fla. The Trump administration on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019, revoked an Obama-era regulation that shielded many U.S. wetlands and streams from pollution but was opposed by developers and farmers who said it hurt economic development and infringed on property rights. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)
September 12, 2019 - 6:07 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The Trump administration on Thursday revoked an Obama-era regulation that shielded many U.S. wetlands and streams from pollution but was opposed by developers and farmers who said it hurt economic development and infringed on property rights. Environmental groups...
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FILE - In this May 19, 2015 file photo, Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett announces a federal lawsuit against several cancer charities in Knoxville, Tenn. A federal judge on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019, blocked Tennessee's new restrictions for registering voters from taking effect on Oct. 1 while a challenge of the law proceeds. Hargett has argued adding penalties bolsters election security. His office didn't immediately comment on the ruling. (Michael Patrick/Knoxville News Sentinel via AP, File)
September 12, 2019 - 1:07 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A federal judge has blocked Tennessee's new restrictions for registering voters from taking effect on Oct. 1, saying Thursday that any benefit of the law won't likely outweigh its potential harm. The ruling, for now, sets aside a law that goes beyond other states by fining...
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FILE - In this July 16, 2019, file photo, the Supreme Court is seen in Washington. The Supreme Court is allowing nationwide enforcement of a new Trump administration rule that prevents most Central American immigrants from seeking asylum in the United States. The justices’ order late Wednesday, Sept. 11, temporarily undoes a lower court ruling that had blocked the new asylum policy in some states along the southern border. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
September 12, 2019 - 9:38 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is allowing nationwide enforcement of a new Trump administration rule that prevents most Central American migrants from seeking asylum in the United States. The justices' order late Wednesday temporarily undoes a lower court ruling that had blocked the new asylum...
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September 12, 2019 - 8:40 am
MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mexican Foreign Secretary Marcelo Ebrard says that Mexico's government doesn't agree with a U.S. Supreme Court order that would block migrants from countries other than Mexico and Canada from applying for asylum at U.S. borders. Ebrard said Thursday that Mexico has a different...
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CORRECTS STATE TO OHIO NOT PENNSYLVANIA - Narcotics detective Ben Hill, with the Barberton Police Department, shows two bags of medications that are are stored in their headquarters and slated for destruction, Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019, in Barberton, Ohio. Attorneys representing some 2,000 local governments said Wednesday they have agreed to a tentative settlement with OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma over the toll of the nation's opioid crisis. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
September 11, 2019 - 7:51 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — A tentative settlement announced Wednesday over the role Purdue Pharma played in the nation's opioid addiction crisis falls short of the far-reaching national settlement the OxyContin maker had been seeking for months, with litigation sure to continue against the company and...
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White House lawyer Steven Menashi, President Donald Trump's nominee for U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit, appears for his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019. Menashi's guarded responses were frustrating at times to both Democrats and Republicans on the Judiciary panel. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
September 11, 2019 - 6:40 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators from both parties criticized a nominee for a federal appeals court for declining to answer questions Wednesday about his work in the Trump White House and Education Department. Steven Menashi, an associate White House counsel, has been nominated by President Donald Trump...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2019, file photo, Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert Wilkie testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Demand for answers escalated as federal officials promised Friday, Aug. 30, 2019, to conduct a sweeping investigation into suspicious deaths at Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center in Clarksburg, W.Va. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)
September 11, 2019 - 5:53 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The government may be required to pay billions of dollars in emergency care claims to veterans after a federal court ruled this week that the Department of Veterans Affairs improperly denied reimbursements for such care received at non-VA facilities. The ruling by the U.S. Court...
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