Endangered and extinct species

The head of an Ice Age wolf, at the Mammoth Fauna Study Department at the Academy of Sciences of Yakutia, Russia, June 10, 2019. Experts believe the wolf roamed the earth about 40,000 years ago, but thanks to Siberia's frozen permafrost its brain, fur, tissues and even its tongue have been perfectly preserved, as scientific investigations are underway after it was found in August 2018. (Valery Plotnikov/Mammoth Fauna Study Department at the Academy of Sciences of Yakutia via AP)
June 13, 2019 - 2:42 pm
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian scientists have found the furry head of an Ice Age wolf perfectly preserved in the Siberian permafrost. The head of a wolf, which died 40,000 years ago, was discovered in the Russian Arctic region of Yakutia. Valery Plotnikov, a top researcher at the local branch of the...
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FILE - A Mexican gray wolf is seen at the Endangered Wolf Center Monday, May 20, 2019, in Eureka, Mo. Mexican gray wolves have been blamed for killing nearly as many cows and calves in the first four months of 2019 as they did all of last year. Federal wildlife managers have documented 88 livestock kills from January through April in New Mexico and Arizona. Nearly 100 were reported for all of 2018. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)
May 27, 2019 - 4:46 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — It's shaping up to be a deadly year for livestock in the American Southwest as the number of cows and calves killed by Mexican gray wolves has skyrocketed, aggravating an already tenuous relationship between U.S. wildlife managers, environmentalists and rural residents...
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This April 29, 2019 photo provided by the United States Geological Survey shows a grizzly bear and a cub along the Gibbon River in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo. Wildlife officials say grizzly bear numbers are holding steady in the Northern Rockies as plans to hunt the animals in two states remain tied up in a legal dispute. (Frank van Manen/The United States Geological Survey via AP)
May 24, 2019 - 7:57 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. officials asked a federal appeals court on Friday to overturn part of a judge's ruling that blocked the first grizzly bear hunts in the Lower 48 states in almost three decades. The case before the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals involves more than 700 grizzly bears in...
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FILE - This February 2017 file photo provided by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife shows a wolf of the Wenaha Pack captured on a remote camera on U.S. Forest Service land in Oregon's northern Wallowa County. A federal proposal to take the gray wolf off the endangered species list has divided states in the West, and has even exposed conflicting views among top officials in Oregon. The governor said Thursday, May 16, 2019, it's critically important that range-wide recovery efforts for wolves across the West be maintained. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP, File)
May 16, 2019 - 6:56 pm
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The gray wolf is on track for a remarkable comeback after being almost exterminated in the contiguous United States, but a Trump administration proposal to take the iconic symbol of the wild off the endangered species list has exposed divisions among states. California says it...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks shows a sow grizzly bear spotted near Camas in northwestern Montana. Native American tribes are seeking permanent protections for the bruins, which would outlaw hunting regardless of the species' population size. (Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks via AP, File)
May 15, 2019 - 1:13 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Native American groups are pressing lawmakers in Congress to adopt permanent protections for grizzly bears, a species widely revered by tribes but that has been proposed for hunting in Wyoming and Idaho. Tribal representatives were due Wednesday before a House subcommittee to...
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FILE - In this Oct. 21, 2018, file photo, a couple walks through a forest with the Frankfurt skyline in background near Frankfurt, Germany. Development that’s led to loss of habitat, climate change, overfishing, pollution and invasive species is causing a biodiversity crisis, scientists say in a new United Nations science report released Monday, May 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, File)
May 07, 2019 - 10:30 am
You may go your entire life without seeing an endangered species, yet the globe's biodiversity crisis threatens all of humanity in numerous unseen or unrecognized ways, scientists say. A massive United Nations report this week warned that nature is in trouble, estimated 1 million species are...
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In this picture taken on Monday, May 6, 2019, visitors view an exhibition of animal excrements at the Prague Zoo, Czech Republic. The park has opened a new permanent exhibition that put on display wide range of animal feces. Placed on the outside walls of a new building with toilets, the exhibition offers information and samples from fossil turds, also known as coprolites, to the excrements of current animals of various size, shape, texture and color. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)
May 07, 2019 - 9:22 am
PRAGUE (AP) — After producing plenty of elephant dung and other manure for years, Prague Zoo has capitalized on its expertise by creating a new permanent exhibit on the world of animal excrement. It displays information and samples of everything from fossil turds, also known as coprolites, from...
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FILE - In this Dec. 14, 2011, file photo, a lemur looks through the forest at Andasibe-Mantadia National Park in Andasibe, Madagascar. Development that’s led to loss of habitat, climate change, overfishing, pollution and invasive species is causing a biodiversity crisis, scientists say in a new United Nations science report released Monday, May 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Jason Straziuso, File)
May 06, 2019 - 12:23 pm
People are putting nature in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday. But it's not too late to fix the problem, according to the United Nations' first comprehensive report on biodiversity...
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In this 2015 photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the American burying beetle handled in Rock Island, R.I. U.S. wildlife officials say the endangered carnivorous beetle is making a comeback and should be downlisted to threatened. The beetle was listed as endangered in 1989 after its historic range over 35 states and three Canadian provinces shrank to just eastern Oklahoma and Block Island off the cost of Rhode Island. Officials say populations now also can be found in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, South Dakota, Texas, and on Nantucket Island off the coast of Massachusetts. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)
May 01, 2019 - 6:13 pm
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Federal wildlife officials said Wednesday a large scavenging beetle that has been classified as endangered since 1989 has become more plentiful and should be downlisted to threatened, a decision that environmentalists said is not justified by scientific data. The American...
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FILE - In this July 10, 2008, file photo, Manuel Lujan, Jr., a former US. representative from New Mexico and Secretary of the Interior, poses for a portrait at his home in Albuquerque, N.M. Lujan, a former Republican congressman from New Mexico who as U.S. Interior Secretary drew fire from environmentalists for challenging the Endangered Species Act has died. He was 90. New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, a distant cousin, on Friday, April 26, 2019, announced Luján's death. (AP Photo/Toby Jorrin, File)
April 26, 2019 - 7:55 pm
SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Manuel Luján Jr., who spent 20 years as a Republican congressman and later as a U.S. Interior Secretary who drew fire from environmentalists for challenging the Endangered Species Act, has died. He was 90. New Mexico Gov. Michelle Luján Grisham, who was a distant cousin, said...
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