Laws

October 16, 2019 - 3:52 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is trying to sort out whether states can prosecute immigrants who use fake Social Security numbers to get a job. The justices heard arguments Wednesday in Kansas' appeal of a state court ruling that threw out three convictions after concluding the state was...
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In this Nov. 14, 2018 photo, East Hampton, Conn., Police Chief Dennis Woessner addresses the Town Council in East Hampton. Chief Woessner has concluded that an officer's membership in a far-right group infamous for engaging in violent clashes at political rallies didn't violate any department policies. Woessner said that officer Kevin P. Wilcox is no longer associated with the Proud Boys group. (Jeff Mill/The Middletown Press via AP)
October 15, 2019 - 6:43 pm
A Connecticut police officer's membership in the Proud Boys, a far-right group known for engaging in violent clashes at political rallies, didn't violate department policies, the town's police chief has concluded in response to a civil rights group's concerns. The East Hampton officer, Kevin P...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019, file photo, Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks at a news conference in Sacramento, Calif. Newsom has signed a law giving child sexual assault victims more time to file lawsuits. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
October 13, 2019 - 10:35 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California is giving childhood victims of sexual abuse more time to decide whether to file lawsuits, joining several states in expanding the statute of limitations for victims over warnings from school districts that the new rules could bankrupt them. The law signed Sunday...
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In this 2014 photo provided by Ryan Parker, two pigs consume discarded milk at Nights And Weekends Homestead in Newport, Maine. The state of Maine has recently clarified rules about giving food waste to pig farms. (Photo courtesy Ryan Parker)
October 13, 2019 - 10:34 am
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Maine has decided that eating like a pig could be a good thing, especially for schools looking to cut down on food waste. A law saying schools can give food scraps away to pig farmers is now on the books in the state. The practice of feeding human food waste to pigs goes back...
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FILE -- In this Sept. 18, 2018 file photo protesters with the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) hold signs to ban fur in Los Angeles prior to a news conference at Los Angeles City. California will ban the sale and manufacture of new fur products and bar most animals from circus performances under a pair of bills signed Saturday, Oct. 12, 2019 by Gov. Gavin Newsom. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel,File)
October 12, 2019 - 6:03 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California will be the first state to ban the sale and manufacture of new fur products and the third to bar most animals from circus performances under a pair of bills signed Saturday by Gov. Gavin Newsom. The fur law bars residents from selling or making clothing, shoes...
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California Gov. Gavin Newsom signs bill AB 1482, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, in Oakland, Calif. AB 1482 will cap rent increases at 5% each year plus inflation. The bill will also ban landlords from evicting tenants without just cause. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
October 08, 2019 - 7:56 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California will limit rent increases for some people over the next decade after Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a law Tuesday aimed at combating a housing crisis in the nation's most populous state. Newsom signed the bill at an event in Oakland, an area where a recent...
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LGBT supporters gather in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, in Washington. The Supreme Court is set to hear arguments in its first cases on LGBT rights since the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy. Kennedy was a voice for gay rights while his successor, Brett Kavanaugh, is regarded as more conservative. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
October 08, 2019 - 12:26 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Tuesday heard highly anticipated cases on whether federal civil rights law should apply to LGBT people, with Chief Justice John Roberts questioning how doing so would affect employers. In the first of two cases, the justices heard arguments on whether a...
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FILE - In this June 20, 2019, file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court is set to hear arguments in two of the term’s most closely watched cases over whether federal civil rights law protects LGBT people from job discrimination. The cases Tuesday, Oct. 8, are the court’s first on LGBT rights since Justice Anthony Kennedy’s retirement and replacement by Justice Brett Kavanaugh.(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
October 08, 2019 - 11:42 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Supreme Court arguments over LGBT rights (all times local): 11:30 a.m. Supreme Court justices are mulling what the impact would be if they ruled that federal civil rights law protects LGBT people from job discrimination. The court is hearing arguments Tuesday in two...
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Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott speaks to reporters during the Pac-12 Conference women's NCAA college basketball media day, Monday, Oct. 7, 2019 in San Francisco. (AP Photo/D. Ross Cameron)
October 07, 2019 - 4:36 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott has expressed serious concerns about a new law that would allow college athletes in California to hire agents and be compensated for the use of their names or likenesses through endorsement deals or other money-making opportunities. The law...
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FILE - In this June 17, 2019 file photo, The Supreme Court is seen in Washington. Abortion rights, and protections for young immigrants and LGBT people top an election-year agenda for the Supreme Court. Its conservative majority will have ample opportunity to flex its muscle, testing Chief Justice John Roberts’ attempts to keep the court clear of Washington partisan politics. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
October 07, 2019 - 3:50 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court began a potentially contentious election-year term Monday in seeming general agreement that juries in state criminal trials must be unanimous to convict a defendant. The justices took up a quirk of constitutional law, a 47-year-old ruling that requires unanimity...
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