Marysville-Pilchuck High School shooting

FILE - In this March 24, 2018, file photo, thousands of people gather on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol during a "March for Our Lives" rally in Austin, Texas. The vast majority of mass shooters have acquired their firearms legally with nothing in their background that would have prohibited them from possessing a gun. But there have been examples of lapses in the background check system that allowed guns to end up in the wrong hands. Very few states also have a mechanism to seize firearms from someone who is not legally allowed to possess one.(Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman via AP, File)
September 07, 2019 - 12:39 pm
Most mass shooters in the U.S. acquired the weapons they used legally because there was nothing in their backgrounds to disqualify them, according to James Alan Fox, a criminologist with Northeastern University who has studied mass shootings for decades. But in several attacks in recent years...
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A pedestrian passes a makeshift memorial for the slain and injured victims of a mass shooting that occurred in the Oregon District early Sunday morning, Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio. President Donald Trump is headed to Dayton and El Paso, Texas on Wednesday to offer a message of healing and unity, but he will be met by unusual hostility in both places by people who fault his own incendiary words as a contributing cause to the mass shootings . (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
August 08, 2019 - 12:59 am
SEATTLE (AP) — Just seven months into 2019, the U.S. has experienced almost as many mass killings as occurred in all of 2018. Back-to-back mass shootings in Texas and Ohio brought the total number of mass killings so far this year to 23, leaving 131 people dead. There were 25 mass killings in 2018...
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