Native Americans

This booking image provided by the Yakama Nation shows James Cloud, who was charged along with Donovan Quinn Carter Cloud, with assault with a deadly weapon, for actions related to pointing a gun at a child. According to court documents filed in U.S. District Court in Yakima, Wash., they were identified by witnesses as having shot and killed several people on Saturday, June 8, 2016, the documents state. However, it was unclear if they would be charged with the killings. (Yakama Nation/Yakima Herald-Republic via AP)
June 11, 2019 - 8:19 pm
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — A homeowner told law officers that two men linked to the killing of five people on an American Indian reservation in Washington state approached his residence and briefly took a child hostage at gunpoint while demanding car keys to make their escape, court documents said. The...
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June 01, 2019 - 9:45 am
FARGO, N.D. (AP) — For nearly two centuries, the federal government has repeatedly assured a Native American tribe in North Dakota that it has rights to a reservation river and the issue stayed relatively quiet until oil companies figured out a way to drill under the waterway, which is now a man-...
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FILE - In this Feb. 2, 2018, fle photo Democratic New Mexico state Sen. John Pinto talks about his career as a lawmaker on American Indian Day in the Legislature on in Santa Fe, N.M. Pinto joined the Senate in 1977 and is 92 years old. He was a Marine who trained as a Navajo code talker during World War II. His singing of the "Potato Song" is an annual Senate ritual. (AP Photo/Morgan Lee, File)
May 24, 2019 - 9:36 pm
SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — John Pinto, a Navajo Code Talker in World War II who became one of the nation's longest serving Native American elected officials as a New Mexico state senator, has died. He was 94. Senate colleague Michael Padilla confirmed Pinto's death in Gallup on Friday after years of...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks shows a sow grizzly bear spotted near Camas in northwestern Montana. Native American tribes are seeking permanent protections for the bruins, which would outlaw hunting regardless of the species' population size. (Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks via AP, File)
May 15, 2019 - 1:13 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Native American groups are pressing lawmakers in Congress to adopt permanent protections for grizzly bears, a species widely revered by tribes but that has been proposed for hunting in Wyoming and Idaho. Tribal representatives were due Wednesday before a House subcommittee to...
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May 14, 2019 - 3:40 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Native American tribes are looking to the federal government to help improve access to high-speed internet. The Federal Communications Commission has been weighing changes to a band of spectrum that is largely unassigned across the western United States. No new permanent...
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(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
May 08, 2019 - 4:30 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic leaders pulled two bills concerning Native American tribes from the House floor Wednesday after President Donald Trump criticized one of the bills on Twitter and urged Republicans to oppose it. The bills were to be considered under a fast-track provision that requires...
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This cover image released by Knopf shows "There There," by Tommy Orange. Orange and Frederick Douglass biographer David W. Blight are among this year’s winners of awards handed out by the Society of American Historians. Orange’s “There There,” the acclaimed story of a Native American community in the Bay Area, won the SAH Prize for Historical Fiction. (Knopf via AP)
May 06, 2019 - 10:44 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Yale University historian David W. Blight, author of a celebrated biography of Frederick Douglass, can hardly keep up with all the honors. In the past three months, Blight's "Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom" has won the Pulitzer Prize for history and the Lincoln Prize for an...
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FILE - In this July 29, 2008, file photo, Ice Cube, left, and director John Singleton, laugh during the ESPN panel for the documentary series "30 for 30" at the Television Critics Association summer press tour in Pasadena, Calif. Singleton, who died Monday, April, 29, 2019, brought issues of gang violence, the crack epidemic and police brutality gripping South Central Los Angeles in the early 1990s and influenced a generation of people of color. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles, File)
April 30, 2019 - 7:09 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Much has been made about how John Singleton brought the issues gripping black youth in South Central Los Angeles to mainstream audiences with his 1991 classic "Boyz N the Hood." But the themes of that film, and his others about African Americans in Southern California, also...
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April 27, 2019 - 10:07 am
DETROIT (AP) — In a story April 26 about the FIRST Championship robotics competition, The Associated Press reported erroneously the first name of the FIRST president. His name is Don Bossi, not Dan. A corrected version of the story is below: Youth robotics global championship returns to Detroit...
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Charles Walker, left, representing the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, testifies on 4-16-2019 in front of the House Administration Subcommittee on Elections at a field hearing in Fort Yates, N.D., related to voting rights and election administration accountability. (Mike McCleary/The Bismarck Tribune via AP)
April 16, 2019 - 5:01 pm
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Native American voters face poor access to polling sites, discrimination by poll workers and unfair identification requirements, tribal leaders told members of Congress who traveled Tuesday to a reservation in North Dakota where voting rights were a key issue in last year's U...
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