Personal health insurance

The HealthCare.gov website main page. The Trump administration is clearing the way for insurers to sell short-term health plans as a bargain alternative to pricey “Obamacare” for consumers struggling with high premiums. But the policies don’t have to cover pre-existing conditions and benefits are limited. It’s not certain if that’s going to translate into broad consumer appeal among people who need an individual policy. (HHS via AP
August 01, 2018 - 3:37 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumers will have more options to buy cheaper, short-term health insurance under a new Trump administration rule, but there's no guarantee the plans will cover pre-existing conditions or provide benefits like coverage of prescription drugs. Administration officials said...
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August 01, 2018 - 11:49 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Trump administration's short-term health insurance plans. (All times local): 11:30 a.m. The Trump administration's new regulation expanding short-term health insurance plans contains what amounts to a legal life preserver in case a key feature is struck down by a...
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July 31, 2018 - 7:10 pm
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina's largest health insurer said Tuesday it's cutting some individual premiums for the first time in over a quarter century, but next year's savings on subsidized "Obamacare" coverage would have been much larger if Washington had left the law alone. Blue Cross and...
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FILE - In this July 28, 2014, file photo, Public Trustee Charles Blahous speaks as then-Treasury Secretary and Managing Trustee Jacob Lew, left, and then-Labor Secretary Thomas Perez, right, listen during a news conference at the Treasury Department in Washington. A new study says ‘Medicare for all’ would raise government health care spending by $32.6 trillion over 10 years. “Enacting something like ‘Medicare for all’ would be a transformative change in the size of the federal government,” said Charles Blahous, the study’s author. Blahous was a senior economic adviser to former Republican President George W. Bush and a public trustee of Social Security and Medicare during the Obama administration. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
July 30, 2018 - 6:15 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Bernie Sanders' "Medicare for all" plan would increase government health care spending by $32.6 trillion over 10 years, according to a study by a university-based libertarian policy center. That's trillion with a "T." The latest plan from the Vermont independent would require...
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