Personal spending

FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2019 file photo Cheryl Monroe, right, a Food and Drug Administration employee, and Bertrice Sanders, a Social Security Administration employee, rally to call for an end to the partial government shutdown in Detroit. The government shutdown left an especially painful toll for African-Americans who make up nearly 20 percent of the federal workforce and historically have been on the low end of the government pay scale. The U.S. Office of Personnel Management says African-Americans make up about 18 percent of the federal workforce of approximately 2.1 million employees. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, file)
January 26, 2019 - 1:11 pm
DETROIT (AP) — For Cheryl Monroe and generations of other African-Americans, federal government jobs have long been a path to the middle class and a way to provide a comfortable life for their families. Then the record-long government shutdown hit, making it hard for the U.S. Food and Drug...
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FILE - In this Jan. 15, 2019 file photo, the main entrance to Mount Carmel West Hospital is shown in Columbus, Ohio. The Columbus-area Mount Carmel Health System said a doctor's orders for potentially fatal doses of pain medicine given to over two dozen patients were carried out by what he calls "a small number of good people who made poor decisions." Mount Carmel Health System said it fired the intensive care doctor, put six pharmacists and 14 nurses on paid leave pending further review and reported its findings to authorities. (AP Photo/Andrew Welsh Huggins, File)
January 23, 2019 - 3:37 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — An Ohio doctor's orders for potentially fatal doses of pain medicine given to at least 27 hospital patients were carried out by employees who "made poor decisions" and ignored existing safeguards, a top administrator told staff in an internal video. The Columbus-area Mount...
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FILE - This April 2017 file photo provided by NerdWallet shows Liz Weston, a columnist for personal finance website NerdWallet.com. (NerdWallet via AP, File)
January 23, 2019 - 8:39 am
Tyler Luker of Plano, Texas, is a high school junior who already knows which college he wants to attend (University of Missouri), how much it costs ($43,300 for out-of-state residents) and how much he can expect his single mother to contribute: nothing. "That's protecting my retirement," says...
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In this Nov. 2, 2018, photo Darlene Hardison speaks during an interview in Detroit. Hardison would have loved to have a funeral for her father and uncle and bury them in marked graves at a Michigan cemetery. But she and her family could come up with only enough money to have them cremated, then left the remains to a Detroit funeral home to bury. Instead, authorities later discovered their cremated remains among nearly 300 others in bags, boxes and other containers inside Cantrell Funeral Home. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
January 20, 2019 - 11:30 am
DETROIT (AP) — Darlene Hardison would have loved to have a funeral for her father and uncle and bury them in marked graves at a Michigan cemetery. But she and her family could come up with only enough money to have Hoover Heags and Arthur Hardison cremated, then they left the remains to a Detroit...
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January 18, 2019 - 12:56 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Tiffany & Co. says holiday shoppers and Chinese tourists spent less on its bling. The luxury jeweler, famous for its little blue boxes, says sales slipped in the holiday shopping season as Chinese tourists spent less while traveling due to the strong dollar, making it more...
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January 18, 2019 - 12:26 pm
These days, many of us wear different hats to earn income on the side. You might clock out of one job and into the next as a ride-hailing driver, Airbnb host, Etsy shop owner or pet sitter. Such "gig economy" work can make for a stressful tax season that eats up your time (and billable hours) and...
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FILE - This June 29, 2016 file photo shows a Target store in Hialeah, Fla. Target shoppers took full advantage of the retailer’s pickup and drive up services over the holiday season, climbing 60 percent from a year earlier and making up a quarter of the chain’s online sales for the November-December period. Target Corp. also announced Thursday, Jan. 9, 2019 that sales at stores open at least a year increased 5.7 percent in the period, up from 3.4 percent a year earlier. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)
January 10, 2019 - 3:41 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Many investors had expected department stores to enjoy robust sales over the holidays in light of a U.S. economy buoyed by low unemployment, higher wages, strong consumer confidence and cheap gas. So when Macy's and Kohl's reported lackluster numbers on Thursday, they were taken...
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FILE - In this Dec. 4, 2018, file photo, Providence guard Makai Ashton-Langford, left, and Boston College guard Chris Herren Jr. battle for a loose ball during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in Boston. The Boston College freshman walk-on was awarded a full scholarship by coach Jim Christian after practice on Thursday, Dec. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)
December 20, 2018 - 4:20 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Boston College walk-on Chris Herren Jr. thought he was forgotten when coach Jim Christian handed out holiday presents after practice. Then the coach motioned to an assistant for an envelope on Thursday. It took Herren a few seconds to figure out what was happening, but he had just...
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Nancy Buchholz holds her late husband Jeff's photo and billing notices from the hospital, showing that care costs had surpassed $300,000. Jeff died six weeks after being diagnosed with cancer this spring. Nancy got Bind coverage through her employer, Dove Healthcare and the only bill she had to pay for his hospital stay was the $1,900 copayment laid out in the new insurance plan. (AP Photo/Stacy Bengs)
December 17, 2018 - 1:04 pm
People with health insurance often pay for coverage they never use. A startup wants to shake that up. It's a radical idea: On-demand insurance that lets customers buy some of their coverage only if and when they need it, similar to how TV viewers might rent a new release from Amazon instead of...
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In this Dec. 12, 2018, photo, Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump's former lawyer, leaves federal court after his sentencing in New York. Trump has gone from denying knowledge of any payments to women who claim to have been mistresses to apparent acknowledgement of those hush money settlements – though he claims they wouldn't be illegal. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
December 13, 2018 - 5:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Abandoned by two of his most powerful protectors, President Donald Trump insisted Thursday that he did not violate campaign finance laws and that the liability for hush-money payments to two women alleging affairs with him rests with his former fixer, Michael Cohen. Both Cohen and...
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